PERBEDAAN POLA KOLONISASI BAKTERI POTENSIAL PATOGEN RESPIRATORI PADA NASOFARING ANAK-ANAK DAN ORANG TUA SEHAT

Hikmawati, Hikmawati (2010) PERBEDAAN POLA KOLONISASI BAKTERI POTENSIAL PATOGEN RESPIRATORI PADA NASOFARING ANAK-ANAK DAN ORANG TUA SEHAT. Undergraduate thesis, Faculty of Medicine.

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Abstract

Background: The pattern of nasopharyngeal colonization by potential respiratory pathogen bacteria is important to be understood as they can be a source of infection for other people. As Age is one of determinant factors affecting nasopharyngeal colonization by potential respiratory pathogen bacteria in healthy people, so there will be difference in colonization among age groups. This study is aimed to know the distinct pattern of potential pathogen respiratory bacteria colonization between children and elderly. Methods: This was an analytic observational study by taking a cross-sectional data with cluster random sampling from the working area of Semarang. Samples were 150 subject children (0-5 years) and the elderly (45-70 years) who were free from symptoms of respiratory tract infection and were conducted nasopharyngeal swab in February-March 2010. Nasopharyngeal swab specimen was isolated in microbiology laboratories of RSUP Dr. Kariadi. The differences of colonization between children and the elderly were tested with χ 2 test and as alternative test, Fischer test, both were processed in SPSS for Windows 15. Results: The prevalence of nasopharyngeal colonization of potential respiratory pathogens in the healthy children and the elderly are respectively S. pneumonia 45.3% and 10.7% (p=0.0001), H. influenzae 12.0% and 1.3% (p=0.009), Enterobacteriaceae 10.7% and 25.3% (p=0.019), S. aureus 6.7% and 8.0% (p = 0.681), M. catharralis 5.3% and 2.7% (p=0.405). Conclusions: Nasopharyngeal colonization of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae in healthy children is higher than in the elderly, in contrast to Enterobacteriaceae in which colonization is higher in the elderly. Colonization of S. aureus and M. catharralis is not significantly different. Keywords: nasopharyngeal colonization, potential respiratory pathogen bacteria, S. pneumonia, Enterobacteriaceae, H. influenza, M. catharralis, S. aureus, healthy children, healthy elderly.

Item Type:Thesis (Undergraduate)
Subjects:R Medicine > RF Otorhinolaryngology
Divisions:Faculty of Medicine > Department of Medicine
Faculty of Medicine > Department of Medicine
ID Code:23387
Deposited By:Ms Lutfiatun Heni
Deposited On:21 Oct 2010 11:20
Last Modified:21 Oct 2010 11:20

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